Koalas injured in bushfires across SA, Vic and NSW are in desperate need for cotton paw mittens, animal welfare groups say.

深圳桑拿网

 

The International Fund for Animal Welfare has asked volunteers to sew cotton mittens for koalas that have been severely burnt. The mittens would be used to cover the animals’s bandages.

Volunteers are encouraged to use the sewing template on IFAW’s website, and to drop off completed mittens at local wildlife centres or at their Sydney offices. 

“Koalas with burns to their paws need to have them treated with burn cream and wrapped in bandages. They then need special cotton mittens to cover the dressings. All this needs changing daily so we’re asking if you can help us by sewing koala mittens – as many as they can before the fire season truly hits,” said IFAW’s Josey Sharrad.

Post by International Fund for Animal Welfare – IFAW.

Jeremy was the first koala to be treated at the Australian Marine Wildlife Research & Rescue Organisation (AMWRRO) in Adelaide. All four of Jeremy’s paws were treated for second-degree partial thickness burns, but the group assures that he is showing positive signs of recovery.  

Animal welfare groups believe more koalas will be admitted to centres in the coming days. 

“We’ve got one coming in very shortly and another following it,” Adelaide Koala and Wildlife Hospital founder Rae Campbell told ABC. “I think over the coming days and weeks there will be many, many more. 

“Many of them, if they’re picked up early enough and treated, are able to be released and have normal lives.”

Authorities declared on Thursday that the Sampson Flat bushfire had been fully contained, six days after the blaze began its trail of destruction.

The fire destroyed 27 homes, burnt through almost 13,000 hectares and left 134 people, mainly firefighters, injured.

Remarkably, no lives were lost.

 Post by Australian Marine Wildlife Research & Rescue Organisation Inc. (AMWRRO). Post by Australian Marine Wildlife Research & Rescue Organisation Inc. (AMWRRO). Post by Australian Marine Wildlife Research & Rescue Organisation Inc. (AMWRRO).

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